Las Vegas marks 2 years since mass shooting that killed 58

LAS VEGAS — From a sunrise event to a reading of victims' names at the time the bullets flew, Las Vegas on Tuesday marked two years since the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, with memorials to the 58 people killed at a country music festival."No anniversary is more terrible than the one that recalls how your neighbors and guests were so wantonly slain, even while their hearts were singing out in joy as they listened to music with their friends and loved ones," Joe Robbins said.The father of 20-year-old Quinton Robbins told a daybreak audience of hundreds about his son, a city recreation worker who died when a gunman rained gunfire from a high-rise hotel into a crowd of 22,000 on Oct. 1, 2017."None of us want those who lost to be forgotten," Joe Robbins said.Nevada Gov.

US promises nearly $17M for survivors of Las Vegas massacre

LAS VEGAS — The U.S. government is allocating nearly $17 million to help people affected by the Las Vegas Strip mass shooting that became the deadliest in the nation's modern history, Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said Friday.The money from the Justice Department will defray costs of counseling, therapy, rehabilitation, trauma recovery and legal aid for thousands of people affected by the Oct. 1, 2017, massacre, Whitaker said in Cincinnati.Fifty-eight people died and more than 850 were injured when a gunman opened fire from a high-rise hotel into an open-air country music concert crowd of 22,000 people.Whitaker termed the $16.7 million grant to help victims, family members, medical personnel, first responders, concert staff, vendors and witnesses as an effort to help Las Vegas heal."We have already provided $3 million to cover expenses for state and local law enforcement in Las Vegas and in Clark County following last October's horrific mass shooting," he said.The Justice Department said the money will supplement and replenish a compensation fund managed by the Nevada Office for Victims of Crime .A committee overseeing the state fund created a protocol to make payments on a scale to more than 530 people.Relatives of those killed and people whose injuries left them with permanent brain damage or paralysis received the maximum $275,000.Smaller sums were given to those who were hospitalized or received medical care on an emergency or outpatient basis in the days after the shooting.Program coordinator Michelle Morgando said Friday that $3.2 million has been disbursed to date for claims arising from the Route 91 Harvest Festival tragedy.A motive for the shooting has not been found.

Las Vegas memorial: 'Pain that never really goes away'

LAS VEGAS — A flock of doves fluttered skyward at sunrise in Las Vegas on Monday, each bird bearing a leg band with the name of one of the 58 people slain in the deadliest mass shooting in the nation's modern history one year ago.Marking the anniversary of the night that a gunman opened fire from a high-rise casino suite on a crowd of 22,000 country music fans, Nevada Gov.

MGM sues Vegas mass shooting victims, argues it isn't liable

LAS VEGAS -- MGM Resorts International has sued hundreds of victims of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history in a bid to avoid liability for the gunfire that rained down from its Mandalay Bay casino-resort in Las Vegas.The company argues in lawsuits filed Friday in Nevada and California that it has "no liability of any kind" to survivors or families of slain victims under a federal law enacted after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.The lawsuits target victims who have sued the company and voluntarily dismissed their claims or have threatened to sue after a gunman shattered the windows of his Mandalay Bay suite and fired on a crowd gathered below for a country music festival.High-stakes gambler Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and injured hundreds more last year before killing himself.

Mass shooting survivors name baby after Vegas hockey player

LAS VEGAS — A couple who survived the October shooting at a Las Vegas country music festival has named their newborn after one of the Vegas Golden Knights hockey players, saying the team has brought some positivity into their lives after the tragedy.KLAS-TV reports that Lauren and Brad Sugars' girl was born May 18, the same day the Golden Knights beat the Winnipeg Jets to advance to the NHL Stanley Cup playoffs.

Court hearing scheduled for man accused of providing ammo to Vegas shooter

PHOENIX — A court hearing is scheduled Monday for an Arizona man accused of providing armor-piercing ammunition to the gunman in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.The hearing in Phoenix is expected to focus on conditions imposed on Douglas Haig as part of his release from custody.Haig was charged in February with conspiring to make and sell armor-piercing ammunition.Authorities say unfired armor-piercing cartridges found inside the Las Vegas hotel room where Stephen Paddock launched the Oct. 1 attack had Haig's fingerprints.Haig maintains he legally sold tracer ammunition — which illuminates the path of fired bullets — to Paddock in the weeks before the shooting that killed 58 people and ended with Paddock killing himself.The charge centered on armor-piercing cartridges.Haig hasn't yet entered a plea.

$275K promised to families of those killed in Vegas shooting

LAS VEGAS — A $31.5 million victims' fund that started as a GoFundMe effort will to pay $275,000 to families of the 58 people killed in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.The Las Vegas Victims Fund said Friday that $275,000 will also be paid to 10 other people who were paralyzed or suffered permanent brain damage in the Oct. 1 shooting on the Las Vegas Strip.The nonprofit posted a chart projecting payments on a sliding scale to a total of 532 people, including 147 who were hospitalized.Organization spokesman Howard Stutz says the nonprofit expects to pay 100 percent of the funds raised beginning Monday.Police say 851 people were hurt by gunfire and fleeing an open-air concert under fire from a gunman in a nearby high-rise hotel.

Las Vegas shooter's girlfriend said she handled ammo

The girlfriend of the gunman behind the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history told authorities they would probably find her fingerprints on bullets because she sometimes helped him load ammunition magazines.An FBI agent tells a judge in warrant documents made public Friday that Marilou Danley wasn't arrested when she returned to the U.S. from the Philippines days after the Oct. 1 shooting, and that she was cooperating with investigators.Her boyfriend, Stephen Paddock, shot himself dead after firing from a Las Vegas Strip casino into a concert crowd, killing 58 people and injuring hundreds.The agent says in the Oct. 3 document that there was no evidence at that time of "criminal involvement" by Danley, but that investigators had not ruled out the possibility.The document says Danley also provided a DNA sample to authorities.FBI spokeswoman Sandra Breault in Las Vegas said late Friday she could not comment about Danley or the investigation.

Thousands to ring in 2018 in Las Vegas under tight security after October mass shooting

LAS VEGAS — Tens of thousands of revelers will ring in the new year in Las Vegas under the close eye of throngs of law enforcement officers and National Guard members assembled to keep them safe just three months after the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.Tourism officials expect about 330,000 people to come to the city for festivities that are anchored by a roughly eight-minute fireworks display at the top of seven casino-hotels.

Plan released for dividing money to Vegas shooting victims

LAS VEGAS — A plan that will be used to divide donations for victims of the Las Vegas mass shooting was finalized Friday with a significant change that allows injured people who were not hospitalized to seek some of the money.The committee overseeing the distribution of more than $22 million revised an earlier draft in response to requests that money also go to people who didn't require a hospital stay after the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history.The group received more than 1,700 comments from victims' families, survivors, community members and others.The plan calls for most of the money to go to relatives of the 58 people killed or victims whose injuries left them with permanent brain damage or paralysis, requiring constant home care.Individuals who were physically injured and hospitalized can submit a claim.

Man who survived Las Vegas shooting killed in hit-and-run

LAS VEGAS — A man who survived the Oct. 1 mass shooting that killed 58 concert-goers and injured hundreds in Las Vegas has been killed in a hit-and-run in southern Nevada.Roy McClellan of Las Vegas was killed Nov. 17 while hitchhiking on State Route 160 in Pahrump, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Las Vegas.His widow, Denise McClellan, told KSNV-TV she can't understand why her 52-year-old husband survived the shooting, only to die in a hit-and-run.

Sheriff: Gunman who killed 58 in Las Vegas fired more than 1,100 rounds

LAS VEGAS — The top lawman in Las Vegas says the gunman who killed dozens of people at a concert last month fired more than 1,100 rounds.The newly released estimate from Sheriff Joe Lombardo offers more detail about the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history.Lombardo tells the Las Vegas Review-Journal he was aware of the previously unreported figure because his department's forensics lab is working with the FBI to process all ballistics evidence.Stephen Paddock killed 58 people and injured hundreds more on Oct. 1 after he shattered windows of his suite on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay hotel-casino and unleashed withering gunfire at the music festival below before killing himself.Authorities have said they have not determined Paddock's motive or why he stopped shooting.

"Evil does happen:" Attorneys filing Vegas shooting lawsuits with 450 plaintiffs

LAS VEGAS — Attorneys who filed one of the first lawsuits after the Oct. 1 mass shooting that killed 58 concert-goers and left hundreds injured on the Las Vegas Strip filed four new negligence cases Monday on behalf of more than 450 victims.This time, however, Houston-based lawyers Chad Pinkerton and Mo Aziz filed the cases in Los Angeles against companies including MGM Resorts International, the corporate owner of both the Mandalay Bay resort and the Route 91 Harvest Festival concert venue.Pinkerton said the intent was to get the cases before a jury less likely to be influenced by the size and clout of a casino company that is both an active political contributor in Nevada and the largest employer in the state."Los Angeles is a better venue for fairness for our clients," Pinkerton said in a telephone interview ahead of a news conference announcing the filing of two wrongful death lawsuits, a third case stemming from a woman's head wound and a fourth on behalf of 450 people claiming injuries in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history."There would be certain advantages for MGM to defend its case in Nevada," Pinkerton said, adding that a jury in MGM Resorts' hometown might include people with direct or indirect ties to the company and its more than 70,000 employees.The company has said through representatives it won't litigate shooting lawsuits in the media.